Month: October 2002

  • Burst.com's streaming snake oil

    Salon recently ran a two part feature on Burst.com. The feature talks how Microsoft stole Burst.com technology, and positions Burst.com as a David to Microsoft’s Goliath. Salon’s articles are normally wonderul. The problem with this one is that the author apparently didn’t have the technical background to see through Burst.com’s “technology”. While I was Apple’s…

  • MPEG LA extends AVC "essential patents" submission deadline

    MPEG LA has extended the deadline for companies to submit patents neccessary to support AVC, from October 11, 2002 to January 31, 2003. That makes sense, since AVC hasn’t quite reached FDIS (Final Draft International Standard) status, and “essentiality” — whether a patent is essential to AVC — can only be determined against the final…

  • Qualcomm's new 3G chipset supports MPEG-4

    Qualcomm has announced that they’re shipping an important new mobile chipset for 3G (CDMA 2000 1X) devices, and it includes their “Qtv” MPEG-4 decoder. This is a significant bellwether for MPEG-4. It says that Qualcomm’s customers are demanding MPEG-4 — and as significantly, not Windows Media or RealSystem — in the DNA of their mobile…

  • RealNetworks releases open-source client

    Last night, RealNetworks announced to Helix Community members that its Helix DNA Client source code is available to registered users. The jury is still out on whether RealNetworks’ open source are going to make a difference. The Helix mailing lists have been dead quiet, suggesting massive disinterest. The RealNetworks licenses don’t help — for example,…

  • Flash for Palm OS

    Today, Macromedia demonstrated Flash Player on one of the new Sony Cliés at DevCon 2002. According to the presenter, “Flash Player is built into the device”. This is very significant news for digital media content developers since it suggests that Flash will be the de-facto standard for rich-media on PDAs, and for Palm since Flash…

  • Windows Media Audio reverse-engineered

    Microsoft’s very-proprietary Windows Media Audio format has been reverse engineered as part of the FFmpeg project. Codecs from the FFmpeg project are licensed under the LGPL and are used by several other projects. Now, the only hitch to building Windows Media Audio-compatible players is Microsoft ASF-related patent, which I personally believe is invalid based on…

  • Get ready for Wi-Fast: 802.11a and 802.11g

    Wi-Fi (a.k.a. 802.11b, a.k.a. AirPort) is mainstream. We know this because my mom recently asked me what “wardiving” was. I calmly explained that “wardiving” was a tragic occurance in which Slashdot readers die while looking for open wireless access points at the bottom of the ocean. The good news is that when they wash up…

  • Consumers shun copy-protected audio CDs

    In a survey recently released by GartnerG2, 77% of respondents said that they should be able to copy CDs for personal use in another device, 60% said they should be able to give copies of CDs to members of their families, and 82% said that they should be able to copy CDs for personal backup…

  • Wireless data services: "You are here"

    A Red Herring article discusses where we are on the high-speed wireless data curve, comparing this period of network upgrades to the analog-to-digital transition of the last decade. …the industry remains in the midst of its most difficult transition since the migration from analog to digital voice service in the mid-’90s. Back then, the business…

  • Microsoft's Palladium (DRM) talk at MIT

    Arnold Reinhold has posted a summary of the technical overview of Palladium that Microsoft recently presented at MIT. Palladium is a collection of Microsoft technologies for enforcing system-wide DRM. The technologies fall into four categories: (1) “Curtained memory” ensures that code can’t observe (read) or modify (write) other code’s memory. (2) “Attestation” means that code…